About the President

Mark Dimondstein [bio] is president of the American Postal Workers Union.

As the APWU’s top officer, he is responsible for all of the operations of the national union, as outlined in the Constitution and Bylaws. He oversees all the activities conducted by the officers and staff of every department, division, and committee defined by the APWU Constitution.

The president is the editor of the union's bimonthly magazine, The American Postal Worker, and is the union’s spokesperson on all contractual and legislative matters of concern to the union.

Along with the APWU’s other top officers, the president is elected by mail-ballot referendum of the membership every three years.


Mark Dimondstein, President
American Postal Workers Union

Mark Dimondstein is President of the American Postal Workers Union, which represents more than 200,000 employees of the U.S. Postal Service and approximately 1,500 employees in the private-sector mailing industry. He began his first three-year term in November 2013 and was re-elected on October 5, 2016 for another term starting in November 2016. 

Since taking office, Dimondstein has transformed the APWU into a fighting, activist organization. He helped establish A Grand Alliance to Save Our Public Postal Service, strengthened the unity among the four postal unions, helped forge the Campaign for Postal Banking, and led the successful fight against a privatization scheme involving the office-supply chain, Staples. In the union’s recent contract fight, he outlined a vision that emphasizes the unity between the demands of postal workers for a good contract and the demands of the American people for an expanded, vibrant, public Postal Service.

Prior to taking office as president, Dimondstein held a variety of positions in the APWU. He was elected to six consecutive terms as President of the Greater Greensboro Area Local, serving from 1986 to 1998. From 2000 to 2010, he served as National Lead Field Organizer, where he engaged in a series of ground-breaking union organizing campaigns and contract negotiations for private-sector workers in the mailing industry. In tribute to his efforts, he received the AFL-CIO Southern Organizer of the Year Award in 2001.

During his years in Greensboro, he was appointed by the City Council to serve on the Greensboro Human Relations Commission, a position he held for six years. In addition, he served as the coordinator of North Carolina Labor Against the War, co-founded the Greensboro Chapter of Jobs with Justice, and helped initiate a local coalition, Postal Customers and Workers United to Save the Public Postal Service.

Dimondstein began his postal career in 1983. He has been married to his union-activist wife, Melissa, for more than 40 years. They have three adult daughters and three grandchildren.

Throughout his many years of activism, Dimondstein has held the fervent beliefs that the union belongs to the members, the American people deserve a vibrant public Postal Service, and workers everywhere deserve dignity and respect.