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APWU Web News Article 22-2019

Join Us on April 15 for the APWU’s Tax Day of Action!

04/03/2019 - On Apr. 15, postal workers are letting the public know that the Postal Service operates with NO tax dollars. Contact your local or state officers to find out how you can participate!

If there isn’t a Tax Day event in your area, do a digital action by sharing a social media post by the APWU or the US Mail Not for Sale campaign!

Go to usmailnotforsale.org or call 844.402.1001 to tell your member of Congress that you support the PUBLIC Postal Service!

A Woman For All Seasons

Dedicated to Memory of Eleanor G. Bailey

04/02/2019 - (This article first appeared in the March/April 2019 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine) 

By Retirees Department Director Nancy Olumekor

Dedicated APWU unionist Eleanor G. Bailey passed away on December 12, 2018 at the age of 87. Over the course of her life, Eleanor never stopped fighting and organizing.

What's to Come in Interest Arbitration

04/02/2019 - (This article first appeared in the March/April 2019 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine) 

By Industrial Relations Director Vance Zimmerman 

Our efforts to reach a new contract are now entering the next phases of mediation and interest arbitration.

In mediation, an impartial mediator engages the Postal Service and the APWU negotiating teams in an attempt to break through any impasses and reach an agreement. If mediation does not lead to a voluntary agreement, we will move to interest arbitration.vvvv

Power in the Mail and with the Vote

04/01/2019 - (This article first appeared in the March/April 2019 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine) 

By Vice President Debby Szeredy

Power is in the vote. We need each and every one of our postal workers to register to vote in every state, city and town in our country. We have over 153,000 members in the APWU. We would be more powerful if everyone registers and votes for issues and candidates that can save the public Postal Service.

In 2019, APWU locals and members can mobilize other members to register to vote, and non-members to join APWU and register to vote at the same time. Multiple states around the country have purged voters from their registrars, so you should make sure you’re still on the rolls and re-register if necessary. People died for us to have the right to vote; we must use it to vote for representatives that will support our working interests. Voting can save our livelihood and can make the difference in stopping the destruction of the public Postal Service.

APWU Web News Article 21-2019

Postal Employees and Retirees See Threats to Pay and Benefits in White House Budget

03/29/2019 - The White House released its plans for the fiscal year 2020 budget this month. It once again attacks workers, calling for deep cuts to salaries, retirement and health benefits. It also echoes parts of the Postal Task Force December 2018 report that calls for the elimination of union negotiated collective bargaining rights over pay, creating a postal employee pay system similar to what is seen in the federal workforce.

Further mirroring the Postal Task Force report, the budget calls for privatization of the Postal Service in part, including outsourcing processing and sortation to private companies, and providing access to mailboxes to third parties.

“The cuts in the current White House budget proposal clearly come at the expense of postal employees, retirees, and the American people,” President Mark Dimondstein said. “Similar attacks on postal workers and universal postal service were also seen in the June 2018 report from the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in which the White House proposes to sell the Postal Service to the highest corporate bidder.”

Are We Going to Let the Big Corporations Privatize Us?

Including the Service We Give to Our Country?

01/16/2019 - (This article first appeared in the January/February 2019 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine) 

By Vice President Debby Szeredy

Let’s talk about the facts. Here I am, a union postal worker. What will happen if I don’t step up and help mobilize my co-workers and my community to stop privatization?

The free market plan is to privatize any and all areas that are vital to the American public. We have seen how privatization affects us. Examples of privatization include: our health care system, water and sewer services, bus and transit systems, parking meters, tolls, roads and bridges, prison systems, mortgage and pay day loans, student loans, deregulation of fossil fuels that pollute our planet, and the money in politics (dark money) that helps to fund candidates who will work hard to privatize public services.

Not Surprising - USPS 2012 Cuts Do Not Create Projected Savings

01/16/2019 - (This article first appeared in the January/February 2019 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine) 

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) Oct. 15 report proves what postal workers have been shouting for years – cuts to mail processing and service is not the answer to the challenges facing the Postal Service.

In 2011, the Postal Service embarked on a disastrous endeavor to close and consolidate more than two hundred mail processing facilities in an attempt to save money. In 2015, the Postal Service began the second part of its reckless cost-cutting program – called the Operational Window Change (OWC) – revising its First-Class Mail (FCM) service standards. These changes included the elimination of single-piece overnight FCM service and shifting some First-Class pieces from the two-day service standard to a three-day service standard, as well as additional closings and consolidations of processing plants.

The Postal Service claimed these changes would lead to savings of over $1.6 billion over the 2016 and 2017 fiscal years. But, according to a new audit report from the OIG, the results haven’t even come close to that.

The Ostrich Syndrome

01/16/2019 - (This article first appeared in the January/February 2019 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine) 

By President Mark Dimondstein 

“Bury your head in the sand” is a common saying based on the myth that when an ostrich senses danger, it buries its head, believing that if they do not see the danger, it does not exist.

Postal workers are facing great dangers from corporate, financial and political forces pulling the strings behind both the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) proposals of June 21 and the new White House Task Force report of Dec. 4 (See page 6 on the Task Force). Sticking our heads in the sand and pretending the threats do not exist will not work any better for us than for the ostrich.

White House Targets Postal Workers

01/16/2019 - (This article first appeared in the January/February 2019 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine) 

On Dec. 4, 2018, the U.S. Treasury Department released the long-awaited report by the White House’s Task Force on the United States Postal System. The Task Force was created by an executive order issued on April 12, 2018. It was chaired by the Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, with the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Director of the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) also serving on the committee. This task force report followed a June 21 recommendation from the White House Office of Management and Budget, which called for the wholesale privatization of the USPS, i.e. selling it to private corporations.

APWU News Bulletin

Watch and Share our New Ad: The US Postal Service - Keep it. It's Yours!

11/16/2018 - We’re ramping up our campaign to stop the White House’s proposal to sell the USPS to private corporations — and we’re asking every APWU member to join the fight. We partnered with the National Association of Letter Carriers to produce a new ad to spread the word about the consequences of a postal corporate takeover.

Will you watch it and share it with your friends to help us tell the White House that the U.S. Mail is Not For Sale?

Click here to watch the ad!

NSB 10-2018 for Web (607.33 KB)

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